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Thirty-eight Americans a minute. That's how many people have been losing their unemployment benefits since June 2. Every minute.

Rounded off, 55,000 a day. For 41 days. That's 2.25 million Americans who have lost the ability to keep a roof over their heads, buy food, keep the electricity on, pay health premiums. They wouldn't be at so great a risk if most Senate Republicans, Sen. Ben Nelson and the damned filibuster rule weren't standing in the way of extending their benefits. And those couple of million may soon have another million for company. If Harry Reid can't twist Ben Nelson's or Gov. Joe Manchin's arm hard enough - or figure out how to get another Republican to join Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins in voting for the extension - an additional 1.1 million people will see an end to their benefits by the end of July.

These aren't Americans who lost their jobs in the past few months and are still making do from savings, credit cards and parental assistance. They're the long-term unemployed – some of the 6.8 million Americans without work for 27 weeks or longer. Most of them, 4.7 million, have been jobless for more than a year. If you've been following the details of our ongoing jobless disaster, you know that both those official figures are post-Depression records. Almost certainly an undercount.

No six degrees of separation comes between them and us. Who doesn't know somebody – or somebody who knows somebody – caught in the grinder of long-term joblessness? A typical case: the guy laid off at 55 and unable to find another job to cover the routine costs of survival, much less provide care for an aging parent and keep a kid or two in college.

Foes of extending unemployment benefits keep spouting two excuses. First, benefits create hobos, layabouts who enjoy spending every day watching cable, drinking six-packs of brew and luxuriating on an average $315 a week instead of looking for a job. For a three-person family, that comes in at $16,380 a year, a couple of grand below the poverty line. Cushy, eh? The second excuse, which we've been barraged with for weeks, is that America cannot afford another extension because of the federal deficit. Between now and November, the extension would cost $33 billion.

These excuses are mere cover for what Republicans who have blocked the extension really want – to make life hard as possible until November. This, they believe, despite their disgraceful record at holding out-of-work Americans hostage to their ideology, will somehow give them cachet to trash the Democrats. And for what? For failing to achieve economically what Republicans have done everything in their power to keep them from achieving. They take their leader Rush Limbaugh seriously.

Paul Krugman describes them as the coalition of the heartless, the clueless and the confused. Right on the first count. But unconvincing on the second two. The heartless are neither clueless nor confused. They have a clear-headed agenda: economic terrorism. They're the real-life version of Saw. And their shameless goal is straightforward: worsen the economic situation for millions of Americans' in hopes of scoring more seats in Congress so they can cause even more damage to people's lives.

If they really wanted to ensure that extended benefits be paid for without increasing the deficit, they could easily accomplish it. For instance, every nickel of the extension could be recaptured if a Big Oil tax loophole bill, S. 4213 had passed. Or they could have chosen not to approve another $37 billion in supplemental war spending. Moreover, the cost of the extension is not so much as it first appears. As Larry Mishel, president of the Economic Policy Institute, pointed out last week on CNN, "the government recovers at least half of the [unemployment benefits] invested this way through higher revenue and taxes."

As for laziness, it's yet another bogus attack on the working class. See this 2007 study at the National Bureau of Economic Research.  Let Krugman – who has been in ass-kicking mode of late – explain:

...as you may have noticed, right now the economy isn’t booming — again, there are five unemployed workers for every job opening. Cutting off benefits to the unemployed will make them even more desperate for work — but they can’t take jobs that aren’t there.

The heartless ignore the fact that Congress has never previously cut unemployment benefit extensions with joblessness so high. As Heather Boushey, Christine Riodan and Luke Reidenbach at the Center for American Progress and the National UnEmployment Law Project wrote last month:

Since the 1950s, federal unemployment insurance extensions remained in place during recessionary periods
until unemployment dropped to as low as 5.0 percent. The highest unemployment rate at which these extensions were allowed to expire was 7.2 percent, following the 1983 recession – substantially lower than our current rate of [9.5] percent.

At the current rate of job growth – 119,000 a month for the first half of 2010 – it will take two years to get the unemployment rate down to 7.2 percent. Unless, of course, as happened in June, more than half a million workers leave the labor force every month. Those drop-outs don't just vanish into thin air. But the more who leave, the better the official jobless rate looks, even though the reality is a demoralized cohort of millions who have given up looking for work and are no longer counted as unemployed. Statistical phantoms.

Laura Clawson Mitchell Hirsch wrote last week at Working America:

Imagine, Senators, that your weekly pay of $3,346.15 were reduced by, say, $3,000 and you and your family were left to try to get by on $346.15 a week — which is, by the way, slightly more than the average weekly unemployment check.

Now imagine that, suddenly, even that meager $346.15 a week disappeared as well.

Unfortunately, way too many Senators can't imagine that prospect any more than they can imagine living on Food Stamps or moving back in with their parents.

Most of the same Senators – like most of the media – also are unaware of another group of unemployed Americans: the several million who aren't eligible for unemployment benefits in the first place. Given their cynical, obstinate resistance to extending benefits to those who are eligible, the mere thought of helping the ineligibles is way down the list of priorities. And nowhere does that list mention remedies for the crippling effects of off-shoring jobs, job loss through automation, stagnant wages and the tripling of the income gap between the ultra-rich and everybody else over the past three decades.

But then, of course, quite a chunk of Democrats aren't too keen on confronting those crucial long-term issues either. Extending unemployment benefits is a good and necessary action. But it is, as it's always been, a stopgap meant to ease acute situations. How large does the Democratic majority have to become before we see somebody with political clout actually doing something instead of merely talking about our chronic economic problems?

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:26 AM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

    •  Heard this number on NPR (10+ / 0-)

      This morning.
      In contrast, $1.00 or tax cuts only returned about 30-35 cents to the economy.

      I'll put on my glasses.... and tell you how sweet your ass is. (w/ apologies to Señor Bega)

      by mHainds on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:55:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Democrats' villain rotation (5+ / 0-)

        is pure distraction. It's just part of their protection racket. And with few exceptions...remember that they are all political actors and they cannot be trusted at all.

        The cynical politics of Democratic failure is simple: in order to hold the country in a legislative center, they will cede power to Republicans by any means necessary. This includes voter manipulation, feckless strategies, lame campaigning, even outright voter alienation as the President showed in the MA Senate race.

        In office or out, Democrat or Republican, their "comity" calls for quick hiring, a fallback to work at K Street lobbying firms, if they lose their seats.

        They simply do not care about the "small people." They care only about their own rich, elitist hides and all the influence they can peddle in office or out.

        Sure, send an angry letter to Ben Nelson - but it would have greater effect in the form of hate mail to Republican Senators, too. They more than deserve a few of mine.

        TAX THE RICH! They have money! I'm a Democrat. That's why!

        by ezdidit on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:26:25 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Fortunately for the Repukes,,, (0+ / 0-)

          I live in Anthony Weiner's district in one of the bluest of blue states, and my state representative and senator are both Democrats, as is my city councilman...so I have a hard time finding an.....oh, wait...there's BLOOMBERG!

          TAX THE RICH! They have money! I'm a Democrat. That's why!

          by ezdidit on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 01:50:24 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I need this "higher math" explained (0+ / 0-)

        to me, and I guess that's an intended pun.  Where does the add'l 63 cents come from?

        •  Take an extreme example. (7+ / 0-)

          Suppose that Smith gets $10, buys something from Jones for that amount; Jones keepss Brown on an extra hour for $10; Brown buys something from Green with his unexpected $10; Green puts it in the bvank.
          There's $30 spent because of a $10 stimulus.
          The money circulates in the economy, but some of it is saved, paid in taxes, or goes for imports in each step.

          Corporations are people; money is speech.
          1984 - George Orwell

          by Frank Palmer on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:47:14 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Make it a no brainer (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Angie in WA State, shaharazade

            then.  In fact, it makes lower taxes on the middle/lower class a no brainer too.

            •  well, guess this Congress fits that no-brainer (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              mataliandy, NYFM, Kitsap River

              appellation, to-a-T, then; because it appears that most of them have no brains, in addition to having no heart and no courage.

              Sheesh.

              What were we thinking?

              The Congress guy we've been waiting looking for is obviously The Wizard of Oz.

              •  Aren't you in Baird's district? (0+ / 0-)

                Did he ever give his constituents a decent excuse for not voting for HIR?

                Living kidney donor needed; type B, O, or incompatible (with paired donation). Drop me a note (see profile).

                by Kitsap River on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 05:59:11 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Yep, and I called his DC office last thursday (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Kitsap River

                  to ask why he voted "Nay" on extension of UI benefits.

                  The staffer, in answer to my question?

                  Told me to go read the website!

                  I interrupted his 'instructions' on where to find the info to give him an earful...

                  How I'd supported the Congressman in the past, voted for him since he first took this office in the late 1990s and even worked on behalf of his campaigns in the past...

                  and ended with, "I only wish he were running for re-election this year - so that I could work for another candidate to vote his ass out of Congress!" ...

                  whereupon I hung up on him.

                  I know - the staffer is only doing his job, but you know what? I'll never be able to call and tell this directly to Baird, so the staffer is the lucky one to catch my ire.

                  I'm still in dispair over Craig Pridemore's pulling out of the (WA-03)race, and just don't see how in the hell Denny Heck is going to beat Jamie Herrera (the young, female, Republican candidate who looks to be the winner of the R primary in August).

                  :(

  •  Don't blame the Republicans, blame the Democrats (24+ / 0-)

    They have the presidency and strong majorities in Congress.  Don't fall for this 60 vote excuse.  Republicans have NEVER had 59 votes in the Senate, at least not in the last 70-80 years.

    You have exactly 10 seconds to change that look of disgusting pity into one of enormous respect!

    by Cartoon Peril on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:30:53 AM PDT

    •  Ben Nelson is a real problem (18+ / 0-)

      now that the two from Maine are on board, if we had his vote this would pass.

      my suggestion?

      Call Ben Nelson's office: (202) 224-6551
      let him know how furious we are!

      Fax Ben Nelson's office: (202) 228-0012
      you can use gotfreefax.com

      let him know his actions are unconscionable
      and unforgivable.

      remind him that he is a Democrat!

      "Toleration is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle." -Helen Keller

      by ridemybike on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:34:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Couldn't get through to Nelson's office (7+ / 0-)

        Telephone rang off the hook--no answer.  Are they afraid to answer the phone up there on the Hill?

        Yes, I'm het, but I'm NOT a Mad Hetter!

        by Diana in NoVa on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:55:22 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

          •  Thanks...I just added it to my diary! (8+ / 0-)

            "Toleration is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle." -Helen Keller

            by ridemybike on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:59:55 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  FORCE THEM TO FILLIBUSTER. (12+ / 0-)

              At the very least make them stand up and read Dickens into the Senate record while the media explains why they are fillibustering.

              "If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?" Coach John Wooden RIP

              by 4CasandChlo on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:10:01 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Nahhhh.... (4+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                DaleA, 3goldens, shaharazade, divineorder
                Make them read their precious Bible. It may be the first time any of them read it all...

                "Ridicule may lawfully be employed where reason has no hope of success." -7.75/-6.05

                by QuestionAuthority on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:15:03 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Reform the Fkng Fillibuster! Read DW above, (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Angie in WA State

                and here

                Call your Senators today! Tell them to Reform it now so we can get some progressive legislation passed!

                www.yesweSTILLcan.org

                by divineorder on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:38:21 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  the time to make THOSE calls will be (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  divineorder

                  just before the winter holiday recess - because when they come back in January, it'll be as a newly constituted Congress, and that is when the motion to change the Rules of the Senate can and will be taken up.

                  As you know (or being a kossack, I assume you know), the US Constitution makes absolutely no rules about the manner in which the Houses of the Legislative Branch of the Federal Government goes about their business, other than to say:

                  US Constitution, Article I, Section Five

                  Each House shall be the judge of the elections, returns and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner, and under such penalties as each House may provide.

                  Each House may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two thirds, expel a member.

                  Each House shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in their judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the members of either House on any question shall, at the desire of one fifth of those present, be entered on the journal.

                  Neither House, during the session of Congress, shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two Houses shall be sitting.
                  [emphasis added]

                  So, the Senate makes up whatever Rules it deems necessary, and then has to abide by them.

                  On voting, bringing bills up for a vote on the Floor and on debate itself, there have been a number of changes since the Founding:

                  Using the filibuster to delay or block legislative action has a long history. The term filibuster -- from a Dutch word meaning "pirate" -- became popular in the 1850s, when it was applied to efforts to hold the Senate floor in order to prevent a vote on a bill.

                  In the early years of Congress, representatives as well as senators could filibuster. As the House of Representatives grew in numbers, however, revisions to the House rules limited debate. In the smaller Senate, unlimited debate continued on the grounds that any senator should have the right to speak as long as necessary on any issue.

                  In 1841, when the Democratic minority hoped to block a bank bill promoted by Kentucky Senator Henry Clay, he threatened to change Senate rules to allow the majority to close debate. Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton rebuked Clay for trying to stifle the Senate's right to unlimited debate.

                  Three quarters of a century later, in 1917, senators adopted a rule (Rule 22), at the urging of President Woodrow Wilson, that allowed the Senate to end a debate with a two-thirds majority vote, a device known as "cloture." The new Senate rule was first put to the test in 1919, when the Senate invoked cloture to end a filibuster against the Treaty of Versailles. Even with the new cloture rule, filibusters remained an effective means to block legislation, since a two-thirds vote is difficult to obtain. Over the next five decades, the Senate occasionally tried to invoke cloture, but usually failed to gain the necessary two-thirds vote. Filibusters were particularly useful to Southern senators who sought to block civil rights legislation, including anti-lynching legislation, until cloture was invoked after a 57 day filibuster against the Civil Right Act of 1964. In 1975, the Senate reduced the number of votes required for cloture from two-thirds to three-fifths, or 60 of the current one hundred senators.

                  Many Americans are familiar with the filibuster conducted by Jimmy Stewart, playing Senator Jefferson Smith in Frank Capra's film Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, but there have been some famous filibusters in the real-life Senate as well. During the 1930s, Senator Huey P. Long effectively used the filibuster against bills that he thought favored the rich over the poor. The Louisiana senator frustrated his colleagues while entertaining spectators with his recitations of Shakespeare and his reading of recipes for "pot-likkers." Long once held the Senate floor for 15 hours. The record for the longest individual speech goes to South Carolina's J. Strom Thurmond who filibustered for 24 hours and 18 minutes against the Civil Rights Act of 1957.
                  [emphasis added]

                  The other interesting thing about cloture - originally, it required a 2/3 vote of the Senators present, but when they lowered it to 3/5 they changed the basis to Senators duly chosen and sworn. So they went from a percentage of those present, to a percentage of the sitting Senators (present or absent).

                  Personally, I wish they would go back to unlimited debate on the Senate floor, as a means to reach the concensus that it was time to have a vote.

                  Make these lackwits stand up in front of the cameras for days at a time and see how the general public reacts to the spectacle of Senators bloviating endlessly while the nation falls apart. Even die-hard conservative Republicans might see the reality of just whom it is they have been voting for all these years.

                  The relentless use of cloture as a way of avoiding their duty to vote on the Legislation before them, by the US Senate, for about 100 years now, has become a major reason why our US Senate is the place good legislation goes to die.

                  •  No need to wait. Waldman says call needed (0+ / 0-)

                    Yes, Mr. President, www.yesweSTILLcan.org David Waldman says: Filibuster Reform Now

                    by divineorder on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 02:59:51 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •   Why wait on the calls? We need to make (0+ / 0-)

                      this a priorty early. What new disaster might overshadow if we wait like you said.

                      David:

                      so I'd argue that if you think there's an imminent danger of losing the majority in the Senate, it's quite likely that you have just two choices as regards filibuster reform:

                        1. take some advantage of filibuster reform and pass some decent legislation while you still can, or;
                        2. sit back and wait to become the victim of filibuster reform instead.

                      In the coming days and weeks, we'll discuss more about the mechanics, politics and procedure of filibuster reform, and why you need to be thinking about it even if you're not quite ready for it.

                      For now, suffice to say that if your concern is that filibuster reform will come back to bite us in the ass, I would say that you're 100% right to be concerned and that you will one day be bitten, whether you act or not. The question is, what will you try to accomplish between now and then?

                      Yes, Mr. President, www.yesweSTILLcan.org David Waldman says: Filibuster Reform Now

                      by divineorder on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 03:04:55 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

      •  Every Nebraska Kossack on this site (12+ / 0-)

        (myself included) should call Sen. Nelson TODAY and tell him to start acting like a Democrat and vote to extend unemployment benefits.

    •  Blame the Republicans (13+ / 0-)

      Democrats have never voted en mass to block something popular. Republicans do it daily and twice on Sundays.

      In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

      by blue aardvark on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:35:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I blame them both (14+ / 0-)

        They both went out on recess without passing this, and without much of a public debate either.  A pox on both their houses.

        Democrats give you the Bill of Rights; Republicans sell you a bill of goods!

        by barbwires on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:40:50 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Really? (0+ / 0-)

          And if they had stayed in session we would have 60 votes?

          The "pox on both houses" attitude form people like you will put the GOP back in the majority. See how much unemployment extensions get passed with a GOP majority. You would never even have a bill on the floor, much less a chance at passing one.

          But please, bloviate some more like a GOP majority loving fool. I'm sure the unemployed will really love having the GOP back in control come November.

          cheers,

          Mitch Gore

          Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

          by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:32:39 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Wow, you really convinced me (0+ / 0-)

            But please, bloviate some more like a GOP majority loving fool.

            Option to name calling:

            Call your Senators

            Fillibuster Reform Now !

            www.yesweSTILLcan.org

            by divineorder on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:43:58 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  All for people calling their Senators (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              divineorder

              But then I'm not the one saying "pox on both their houses" like the commentator I was replying to was.

              cheers,

              Mitch Gore

              Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

              by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:46:57 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yeah, well. Markos called Dem results so (0+ / 0-)

                far watered down to the point of "weak tea" on FP the other day.

                In my view, this is because they choose the 60 vote rule in the Senate, and much else is in reaction to this rule.

                Tell you what, lets give our Dem Party the benefit of the doubt, and assume that a majority want progressive results like Unemployment Benefits extension and massive jobs creation.

                How do WE get there? Name call each other into submission?

                Where do YOU stand on Fillibuster Reform?

                Would you pledge to do something about
                Fight Washington Corruption  "Sign the Pledge to Counter Corporate Corruption"

                then help to lobby to make it so?

                www.yesweSTILLcan.org

                by divineorder on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:58:20 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I can't get behind ending the filbuster (0+ / 0-)

                  Because what happens should the GOP get the majority? I want the ability to prevent a majority form being able to run complete roughshod over a majority.

                  We need more and better Democrats, not removal of the filibuster.

                  cheers,

                  Mitch Gore

                  Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

                  by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:18:55 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Ugh... (0+ / 0-)

                    I want the ability to prevent a majority form being able to run complete roughshod over a majority.

                    should of course read:

                    I want the ability to prevent the majority from being able to run complete roughshod over the minority.

                    Mea culpa.

                    cheers,

                    Mitch Gore

                    Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

                    by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:25:21 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  we're not looking to end the Filibuster (0+ / 0-)

                    after all, that is only the name for the unlimited debate that is (sort of) still the Rule in the US Senate.

                    What we I'd like to get rid of is the cloture rule, instituted in 1841 in response to, get this, a bank bill.

                    This is the vote before the vote, and was designed originally to end Filibusters that were ongoing.

                    It would be more honest if the Senate got rid of the Cloture Rule and went back to Filibustering when there was a Bill they didn't like for whatever reason.

                    It would force Senators who now hide behind the Cloture Rule to step up and do the actual Filibustering, in public, on camera.

                    •  Removing the cloture rule (0+ / 0-)

                      Which was instituted in 1917, not 1861 as you claim, would not get you the bank bill either, since cloture is the rule by which you can end debate. Without the cloture rule you would never force the vote on the bill at all.

                      cheers,

                      Mitch Gore

                      Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

                      by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 04:18:26 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Not in 1917, when there were no cameras or 24 (0+ / 0-)

                        hour news.

                        You are correct, I mis-read the section that tells when the cloture rule was first considered (1841) vs when it was eventually enacted (1917) or amended (1975).

                        Today?

                        Do you seriously think that even the conservative Republican base would sit for watching days or weeks of filibustering, while nothing else goes on?

                        Remember, with so much legislation ongoing in the modern US Congress, they move from bill to bill to bill, scheduling cloture votes and other motions in-between the schedule for the day (or week).

                        Without the cloture vote, they would be forced to stop all other voting while actual  Filibustering was ongoing - at least on the Floor (voting in Committees would continue).

      •  Blame them all (11+ / 0-)

        It was Democrats that airmailed trillions to the banks to save their $150,000,000,000 bonuses and now are pleading poverty, not Republicans.

        •  More mindless rheotric (0+ / 0-)

          So you would rather have had a complete economic collapse because having 50%+ unemployment would be better, right?

          cheers,

          Mitch Gore

          Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

          by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:34:12 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Mindless rhetoric yourself. Where do you get this (0+ / 0-)

            rather have had a complete economic collapse because having 50%+ unemployment would be better,

            Not that I give a flying f*ck for the Republicans...

            How about a link on Republican plans to create 50% there cowboy? Otherwise, all you have is

            Mindless rhetoric

            Surely you can come up with something more reality based to use in defense of watered down Dem accomplishments?

            www.yesweSTILLcan.org

            by divineorder on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:06:40 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Without TARP (0+ / 0-)

              We would have had a systemic collapse of the entire banking sector, which would easily have put over half of all businesses in a position where they could no longer function. Businesses rely on lines of credit in order to function.

              TARP was an ugly but necessary move.

              I think the current reconciled Financial Reform bill is good, though perfect bill. I would certainly like to see more and stronger enforcement and stronger more full-throated version of the Volcker rule be included, but the bill is not bad, and is a solid good step.

              cheers,

              Mitch Gore

              Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

              by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:24:00 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  As the Republicans know, many people will (12+ / 0-)

      Millions of Americans will not have followed the filibuster shenanigans or the Conservadems antics of Ben Nelson.

      All they will know is that the Democrats had a comfortable majority in the Congress, and that they failed to extend unemployment insurance.

      •  Americans also know that were it not for (0+ / 0-)

        Republicans being the party of NO, unemployment insurance would have passed.  

        Just wait until after Labor Day and Americans are reminded of that.

        Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

        by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:06:29 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I am not convinced that they know that at all (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          divineorder

          Hell, there are numerous moron in this very thread blaming Democrats for the failure to pass the extension, and are pissed that TARP prevented a full economic collapse.

          cheers,

          Mitch Gore

          Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

          by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:35:49 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Look over there. The Buck stops with anyone (0+ / 0-)

            But my team b. Hilarious.

            "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

            by justmy2 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 04:53:03 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Unfortunately, the general electorate (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Kitsap River, verso2

          does and will not know that.

          Nixon used very handily the rule that public forgets in 60 days.

          And now, we have the added obstacle of an MSM that has perverted the dialogue by "evenly" presenting "two" sides to everything.

          I applaud (see below) your historical recounting. As for the future, may I suggest a wiser balance of encouragement and fear as motivators rather than outright optimism.

          ambiguity is okay--if you know what I mean

          by dorkenergy on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:08:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  According to the AP %$@@@!!! (10+ / 0-)

      The DEMOCRATS are to blame. Front page on yahoo I see the story "Analysis: How 2million Americans lost jobless benefit"
      The lead in

      But until this month, Senate Democrats have been unable to bring themselves to pass a simple bill that just does it. Instead they've demanded a series of unrelated and often controversial tax and spending add-ons that have enabled Republicans  to mount successful filibusters.

      Its just aggravating. So he does go on to say some stuff about the Republicans filibustering, but the only quote is from Grassley who of course blames the whole thing on Reid. With this kind of reporting I really despair at our chances in Nov election.

      •  CNN also (5+ / 0-)

        they had some smart guy on last week "explaining" how both sides are to blame, but made sure to start off with a whole lot of dem bashing.

        •  It's easy to say both sides are to blame, but (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dorkenergy

          it's also much more accurate to say that Republicans are almost completely to blame while Democrats share very little of that blame.

          That is the distinction that will drive voters to punish the Republicans in November.

          Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

          by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:08:10 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Are they wrong? (4+ / 0-)

        If you are given a mandate, it is probably a good idea to use it.

        They have two Republicans.  They can't get their house in order.   That is a failure of leadership on behalf of the President and Majority Leader.

        "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

        by justmy2 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:45:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes they are wrong (0+ / 0-)

          Because without 60 votes (which we don't have) you can't get shit done.

          cheers,

          Mitch Gore

          Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

          by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:37:27 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Whereas the Republicans could (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Kitsap River, justmy2

            get shit done with fewer than 60 votes since way back in the 1980s.  

            What has changed, other than the Democrats aren't willing to tell the Republicans to take a flying leap, while the Republicans were willing to do so to the Democrats? It really is a question of leadership. A stronger leader would manage the people in the Senate better. Committee assignments and more can be used to persuade obstructionists to cut the crap. That's how the Republicans did it, and it's how the Democrats could do it, but choose not to.

            •  Aisde from the fact (0+ / 0-)

              Huh? The That the GOP didn't have continuous control of the Senate going back to the 80s, what is different is that Democrats have always tried to actually work to get things done in the Senate, even across party lines when there used to be a somewhat sane GOP party to work with.

              So it is the Democratic leaderships fault that the current incarnation of the GOP are obstructionist bat-shit crazy partisans?

              cheers,

              Mitch Gore

              Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

              by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 04:29:01 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Nope (0+ / 0-)

                But it is their fault that they choose to keep pretending that bipartisanship has any meaning in a situation when the opposition is batshit insane. They can choose to keep treating the batshit insane as rational actors, or they can stop. Only one of those two choices will result in getting any democratic priorities passed. However, they've consistently chosen the one that will not have such a result. This means they are stupid, naiive, or only paying lip service to democratic principles.

          •  I guess I don't understand (0+ / 0-)
            how Democrats are not to blame based on you premise.  With at least 2 Republican votes, Democrats seem to have what they need.  Although you said they are wrong, you actually proved them right...unless I am missing something...or 60 doesn't mean what it used to mean.

            "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

            by justmy2 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 01:27:42 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Then you can't count (0+ / 0-)

              we only have 56 Democrats in the Senate (we had 57 until Sen. Byrd died), and two independent, one of who votes to the left of the party. And seeing as the party has to get every single Democratic or allied independent vote in the Senate AND get at least one Republican to side with the Democratic caucus (which we have to have every single member voting with us) on a bill, I would like to know exactly how you blame the Democrats for that situation?

              cheers,

              Mitch Gore

              Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

              by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 04:24:13 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  So members of the Democratic caucus (0+ / 0-)

                are no longer expected to support the Democratic agenda.

                Hint- when you are in a hole stop digging.

                If your position is correct, it is an even bigger indictment on Democrats and the President for allowing the media to report "democrats" had a filibuster proof Senate.  

                Your case makes them look worse, not better.  But maybe that was your intent.

                "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

                by justmy2 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 04:43:55 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  E-mail AP about article! (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Meteor Blades, treehugger

        I read the same article - written by Andrew Taylor, Associate Press.  It was a stronly biased, poorly written, pathetic excuse for journalism.  I sent an e-mail to AP (info@ap.org), expressing my displeasure.  I encourage others to do the same.

    •  In fairness, the GOP agenda is satisfied ... (9+ / 0-)

      ... by a much lower critical mass of legislative membership. They achieve just as much from impeding progress as from setting the agenda.

      Thus they NEVER have to have more than 40 votes in the Senate.

      EVER.

      Because simply "standing still" is the Conservative agenda fulfilled.

      "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." -- Frederick Douglass

      by Egalitare on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:45:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Absolutely. n/t (0+ / 0-)

        Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

        by Sirenus on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:55:19 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Very true. Republicans, being the Party (0+ / 0-)

        of Big Business, need only stop our government from working on behalf of the People to be successful.  That is why the are a danger we can no longer afford to live with.  That is why their days are numbered, and they will be defeated in November.

        Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

        by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:09:50 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Do you have anything substantial to say? (0+ / 0-)

          Because for weeks now, it has been nothing but Pollyannaish "Republicans are toast!" rah-rah'ing.  I believe most understand that Georgeo57 believes that Republicans drool, Democrats rule at this point.  Another 3,000 substanceless replies will not image that opinion any further.

    •  Terri Schiavo..........EOM (0+ / 0-)

      Welcome to the Corporate States of America ®, give us your money, then die quietly.

      by geez53 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:47:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yeah, that will be the way to hand Congress.... (5+ / 0-)

      ...to the GOP next fall.

      They'll blame the Democrats. We'll blame the Democrats.

      Voters, who never will hear all the details, will listen to the smears and the gripes...and vote GOP.

      Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

      by Sirenus on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:54:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Voters will not need to hear ANY details. (0+ / 0-)

        They already know that Republican economic policies ruined their economy and cost them their jobs.  All voters will need is a couple of months of constant reminders during September and October that it was Republicans who caused their current pain.

        Very few voters will reward Republicans for hurting them.

        Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

        by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:12:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I wish I could share your optimisum (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Meteor Blades, Kitsap River

          But I think you put way too much confidence in the ability of the Democratic party to push that reality through the media in a way that will make it clear to the voting public in sufficient numbers to stave off losing seats and possibly control of the House and even the Senate.

          cheers,

          Mitch Gore

          Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

          by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:40:05 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  No, they don't know that. (0+ / 0-)

          They are told that "Congress" blocked their unemployment benefits. They are also told "and you know who controls Congress."
          (The Democrats. The MSM doesn't go into esoteric details describing how the "minority" GOP can block what the Dems want to do.)

          You do realize that most Americans are not political junkies like us? They get their info through two minute soundbites off the corporate media and via lying "I'm just an ordinary citizen, but I just had to let everyone know this!" emails carefully crafted and sent out by neocon and GOP propagandists.

          I get about three of these a week, from Republicans, who believe them, and independents who...wonder....

          Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

          by Sirenus on Tue Jul 13, 2010 at 07:52:05 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Democrats are about 5% to blame. Republicans (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dorkenergy

      about 90% to blame.  The other 5% of the blame goes to the victims of the Republican caused 2008 recession who lost their jobs and are not raising holy hell for extending unemployment benefits and for jobs creation.

      Republicans are gambling that voters will blame Democrats for the pain.  But the last time unemployment was this bad was during the Great Depression.  Voters back then blamed the Republicans, and punished them severely by reducing Republican Senators and Representatives as follows:

      In 1932 Republicans lost 8 Senators,, reducing their numbers to 48 (still a majority in the 96 seat Senate.  Republicans also lost 53 Representatives, reducing their number to 214 of the 435 House seats back then.

      In 1932, when FDR took office, Republicans lost another 13 Senators and another 90 House members.

      In 1934, Republicans lost another 10 Senators, and another 14 House members.

      In 1936, Republicans lost another 16 Senators, bringing 1932-36 loss to 40, and another 12 House members, bringing their 1932-36 House members loss to 178.

      Republicans are playing with fire, and will get burned in 2010.

      Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

      by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:02:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  rec'd for recitation of historical facts but (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Kitsap River

        not for the prediction

        Republicans are playing with fire, and will get burned in 2010.

        If you/we (dems/progs/…) can make it so, No. 57, I'll acknowledge in due course (post-election).

        ambiguity is okay--if you know what I mean

        by dorkenergy on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:46:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  a thought: a fuller recitation, with citations (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Kitsap River

        of FDR's congressional and economic context, stated goals, and achievements (as others, e.g., MB, below have noted) with comparison to current context, stated goals, and achievements, would make for an worthwhile diary, if you're so inclined.

        ambiguity is okay--if you know what I mean

        by dorkenergy on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 03:26:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Hobo Stimulus (0+ / 0-)

      Has anyone gotten a "drop dead" date from the republicans when we can expect to see the Hobos for Jobs stimulus package put a dip in the unemployment rate? If we end this too soon

      They have the presidency and strong majorities in Congress.

      the republicans will say like the wars, we never gave it a chance to win. Perhaps by November?

      Millions of Americans homeless and unemployed.

      How is that NRA support working for you now?

    •  The Republicans (0+ / 0-)

      ...have never gotten all they wanted either (e.g., Social Security privatization). All they really got under Bush were the wars (in the context of 9/11) and maybe the tax cuts passed under--drum roll--reconciliation.

      •  Letting legislation lapse and not enforcing (0+ / 0-)

        rules is not to be taken lightly b. Republicans got there agenda enacted through any means necessary.   The only difference is enough so called democrats played along when necessary and said it was for the good of the country.  

        "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

        by justmy2 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 04:58:13 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Great idea. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lestatdelc, shaharazade

      If the Party of No succeeds in blocking progress, reward them.
      That will really promote progress.
      And what color is the sky on the planet you live on?

      Corporations are people; money is speech.
      1984 - George Orwell

      by Frank Palmer on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:48:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  What a mindlessly stupid comment (0+ / 0-)

      That 18 dip-shits uprated is precisely why the GOP will likely be back in power after the November elections.

      cheers,

      Mitch Gore

      Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

      by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:29:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  true in part, but inadequate (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kitsap River

      Reps are narrowly focused—they need only 40 to obstruct.

      Given that dems are, by contrast, a big tent, we, arguably, need a much larger majority to guarantee either incrementalist or completionist progress.

      Are you suggesting we work to reduce that majority? If so, how does that differ from repub desires?

      Kindly enlighten.

      ambiguity is okay--if you know what I mean

      by dorkenergy on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 03:39:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  correcting/clarifying (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kitsap River, Cartoon Peril

      i'm sure you are not suggesting people be anti-dem.

      My concern is that the 22 recs for your comment are to approve the "blame the Democrats" phrase and that phrase can reasonably be interpreted and relayed as anti-dem.

      ambiguity is okay--if you know what I mean

      by dorkenergy on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 03:51:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks for this, MB (19+ / 0-)

    and, if I may...

    I posted an action diary this morning, please, everyone
    call your senators and reps...

    tell them that this situation is unacceptable,
    tell them we are not going to sit around quietly
    and watch our friends and neighbors slip into poverty.

    remind them, that right now, the amount of people
    without any income at all to feed their families
    is equivalent to the population of Chicago.

    unconscionable!

    "Toleration is the greatest gift of the mind; it requires the same effort of the brain that it takes to balance oneself on a bicycle." -Helen Keller

    by ridemybike on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:30:59 AM PDT

    •  In this economic climate, it is not enough for (0+ / 0-)

      the unemployed to just voter against the Republicans.  They have to raise their voices, march, campaign, lobby and act out until the rest of America gets the message.  

      Where are all the unemployment marches?  Where is the uproar?  We can blame Republicans for taking their jobs, but we can blame the unemployed for not fighting back hard enough to regain them.

      I hope that like Obama and the Democrats, the unemployed are also waiting until after Labor Day to cry bloody murder.  Because if these unemployed  wait until voters are actually paying attention to the election to voice their grievances, voters will hear and side with them.  When this happens,  Republican numbers all across the Country will tank.

      Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

      by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:17:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Have you been unemployed? (5+ / 0-)

        I have, and I can tell you that it was a strain to put food on the table, much less organize or attend a march.  Don't blame the people who are barely hanging on, living in a state of high stress and panic, for not marching.  We have to have their backs right now and fight like hell for them.

        you don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows

        by Dem Beans on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:58:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  You are tiresome (4+ / 0-)

        and your condemnation of the unemployed for not fighting "hard enough" is uninformed and pretty goddamn stupid.

      •  I guess you are referring to someone like me. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Kitsap River

        I am unemployed.  My benefits are exhausted and I have two children.  I am not a 99er. I lost benefits after 26 weeks. I have yet to take to the streets or march on the Capital.  I have called my congressional representatives, one of whom is Roland Burris, but it hasn't done much good.  However, I keep hoping that Congress will see to it to act on behalf of someone who is not extremely wealthy.  Their intransigence can be frustrating.

        In my opinion, taking to the streets is not very worthwhile.  These days protesters are simply herded into a containment area and arrested.  I don't think having an arrest record will help my job search. Riot control has progressed substantially during the last 50 years (have you seen their nifty new sound weapon?) Non-violent protest has not progressed at all.  Do people still believe that in an era when governments can routinely abuse civil liberty and project force against dissent that waving our hands in the air does much good?  

        I have ardently supported the election of Democrats since 1984.  I do so thinking that workers rights may someday be better recognized; that basic health care can be established for all; that civil liberties can be upheld rather than ceaselessly eroded; that the American economy can provide to more than just the lucky few.  It is obvious that I have been hoodwinked and flim-flammed by hum-bugs.  I am a sucker.

        Are we there yet?

        by obelus on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:08:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  link to more info on Unemployment Insurance (8+ / 0-)

    80 % of success is just showing up

    by Churchill on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:31:07 AM PDT

  •  GOP will be known by their actions, not words (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jwinIL14, QuestionAuthority

    80 % of success is just showing up

    by Churchill on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:31:51 AM PDT

    •  No they won't. (7+ / 0-)

      Because they'll send out "ordinary citizen" emails by the thousands that blame "Congress" for this "and we all know who controls Congress."

      They'll pitch the same lie at town hall meetings, media interviews, etc. etc. etc.

      It'll be the classic half-truth twisted into a whole lie and they'll lay it on thick.

      Meanwhile, we progressives will be slamming the few Dems who voted against extending unemployment benefits...and that will be our "message" to the voters.

      Which will reinforce what the GOP is saing, even though that's not our intent.

      The neocons will be delighted.

      Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

      by Sirenus on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:52:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  and the "media" will trumpet that GOP (4+ / 0-)

        distortion all the way to November

      •  That didn't work for Republicans after the (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Churchill

        Great Depression, and those lies will not work on Americans today.  Remember, in 2008 Republicans took much AWAY from Americans.  People will fight much harder to get back what they lost than to fight for what they never had.  

        The 2008 economic meltdown is not very complicated, like climate change.  Even Republican economic guru Alan Greenspan blames Republican economic ideology and policies for destroying the American economy.

        In 2008, Americans understood that Republicans destroyed their economy.  In 2010, they will remember that understanding, and no matter how much Republicans spend trying to undo those memories, voters will punish Republicans for the destruction they created.

        Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

        by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:22:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  AMEN AMEN AMEN!!! (4+ / 0-)

    when the rethugs slapped O/Dems with that first NO!, why was anybody surprised?
    Rethugs do not believe in guv'ment.
    When one does not believe in guv'ment, one cannot govern.  Only Rule!  Dictate!
    'Shame on them' is a useless curse on such as them!

    Never walk into a public restroom while breathing through your mouth.

    by quityurkidding on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:32:04 AM PDT

  •  Another whiner. (15+ / 0-)

    But then, of course, quite a chunk of Democrats aren't too keen on confronting those crucial long-term issues either. Extending unemployment benefits is a good and necessary action. But it is, as it's always been, a stopgap meant to ease acute situations. How large does the Democratic majority have to become before we see somebody with political clout actually doing something instead of merely talking about our chronic economic problems?

    How dare you criticize our Democratic heroes?  What are you doing to help anything?  Dirty old hippie!

    Seriously, MB, thanks for keeping this issue on the front page.

    Good article by Jamie Galbraith in, of all places, TNR.

    What to do? To restore the rule of law means first a rigorous audit of the banks and of the Federal Reserve. This means investigations—Representative Marcy Kaptur has proposed adding a thousand FBI agents to this task. It means criminal referrals from the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, from the regulators, from Congress, and from the new management of troubled banks as they clean house. It means indictments, prosecutions, convictions, and imprisonments. The model must be the clean-up of the Savings and Loans, less than 20 years ago, when a thousand industry insiders went to prison. Bankers must be made to feel the power of the law in their bones.

    Capitalism is the extraordinary belief that the nastiest of men, for the nastiest of reasons, will somehow work for the benefit of us all. - JM Keynes

    by goinsouth on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:32:20 AM PDT

  •  DAY 41, 2.2 million cut off from UI benefits (8+ / 0-)

    80 % of success is just showing up

    by Churchill on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:32:42 AM PDT

    •  Consider that each of those 2.2 million have (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Churchill

      five Americans who are personal friends and/or family, and who will vote Democrat to come to their aid.  That amounts to over 11 million voters.  Many of them are Republicans and Independents, but few ill side with the Republicans in 2010.  

      Republicans will not be able to win in 2010 because they will lose both the spin and the numbers games.  

      Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

      by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:33:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Certainly agree that they don't feel it (9+ / 0-)

    I'm not at all convinced that those that haven't experienced it can feel for those currently trying to survive on/losing their UE insurance.

    This especially applies to the "super rich" and "rich," but also to the incredible shrinking "Middle Class." To see something is not to experience it for yourself. I know that after our experience with job loss and UE, We had changed. We never looked at things the same way and never begrudge the unemployed their meagre assistance.

    "Ridicule may lawfully be employed where reason has no hope of success." -7.75/-6.05

    by QuestionAuthority on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:32:48 AM PDT

    •  Yep. (6+ / 0-)

      I had my "awakening" after 9/11 when my husband lost his job. I'd always prior to that supported the social safety net, including unemployment, but I "got it" on a completely different level after that first layoff.

      Lisa

      All Kossacks are my allies, but if you can't express your thoughts in a civil and kind manner, I won't be engaging in a conversation with you.

      by Boston to Salem on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:37:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I had my awakening (5+ / 0-)

      about 30 years ago after getting RIF'ed from my first good job (low paying, but in my chosen field and interesting).  I remember clearly the hurdles for even collecting a pittance of unemployment, and the shame and discouragement, also.

      Democrats give you the Bill of Rights; Republicans sell you a bill of goods!

      by barbwires on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:50:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  We remember it from the 1990's (5+ / 0-)

        I lost my airline job and a few months later, my wife lost hers. It was mid-November...I remember taking my wife and our two little girls to stand in line to pick up a food donation around Christmas time. It made a big impact on all of us...We barely kept our house.

        We still donate heavily to charities that provide the basics to those down on their luck.

        "Ridicule may lawfully be employed where reason has no hope of success." -7.75/-6.05

        by QuestionAuthority on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:23:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  It is likely that Republicans killing (0+ / 0-)

      unemployment insurance extensions will create a tipping point of pain for the unemployed, which will lead to their beginning to scream bloody murder.  Once that happens, their neighbors will care what happens to them, and vote Republicans out of office.

      Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

      by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:35:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I have been there (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Meteor Blades

      In the fifteen years I was in software test, I was laid off, RIFfed, downsized, outsourced, contract terminated, and canned (for demanding my back pay!) ten times. It happens a lot in software.

      Of those, five were layoffs, RIFs, downsizing, outsourcing, or being canned for wanting to be paid. I couldn't even get unemployment for the last; they cheated me out of that, too. (And I have yet to see a cent of my back pay; it's been over six years and they owed me over $8000. The company's CEO, Scott Wallin, is a thief.)

      Charles has been there, too. In fact, there have been times we were both off work at the same time. We do not begrudge the unemployed anything. It is harder to find a job right now than I've ever seen it before and I've been working since I was 18. I am now 50.

      I'm not looking. I am disabled and spend a lot of time doing dialysis. I have no time left to work!

      Living kidney donor needed; type B, O, or incompatible (with paired donation). Drop me a note (see profile).

      by Kitsap River on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 06:27:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Conclusions (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mHainds, annieli
    1) The problem is not the President. It's the GOP and the conservative Democrats.
    2) Let's offer them a trade. They can have their Bush tax cuts extended if and only if twice that amount of money is spent on social welfare programs - after all, we have to make up for the previous decade's worth of tax cuts.

    In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

    by blue aardvark on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:34:18 AM PDT

  •  I a curious (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade, Demi Moaned

    This sounds like a tragedy to me.
    But thinking politically, how much of America agrees with us?
    Has this been polled yet?  
    Has anyone asked this question?
    "Do you agree with the GOP, that it is more important to reduce the deficit, than to extend unemployment benefits to millions of Americans?"
    Some of those losing the benefits will soon be on the streets.  
    It sounds like the GOP is dead set on crashing this economy, at least through November.  

    I'll put on my glasses.... and tell you how sweet your ass is. (w/ apologies to Señor Bega)

    by mHainds on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:35:17 AM PDT

    •  Polls today don't matter, because they come (0+ / 0-)

      before Democrats have place the issue of Republicans destroying our economy at center stage where it belongs.

      The first attitude polls that will matter will come in mid-September, and by mid-October we will all see just how much Americans care about their economy, and how severely they intend to punish the Republicans who destroyed it.

      Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

      by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:40:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Time to Tie Congresses Pay to Unemployment (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    The Truth, Kitsap River

    Anytime the Unemployment rate tops 6% Congress should only be paid unemployment rates. After the normal period of pay Congress will also be forced to go hungry until the Unemployment gets extended.

    This would do 2 things at least. First in force them to make sure there are jobs for Americans and second it would teach these Rich Pricks what it is like to get by without a job our healthy paycheck.We should also tie their Insurance in the same manner the unemployed are forced to deal with.

    "Maybe the American eagle should be replaced with the ostrich." www.secure.taxcannabis.org/page/contribute/50000?source=weareprop19_d

    by SmileySam on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:37:58 AM PDT

    •  I'd vote for that (0+ / 0-)

      but I'm concerned that they'd still be given their campaign cash bribes by the rich and the corporate, and would find some way to make ends meet on that. Not like any of them (except maybe one or two) are even middle class at this point. They're all rolling in dough.

      Living kidney donor needed; type B, O, or incompatible (with paired donation). Drop me a note (see profile).

      by Kitsap River on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 06:29:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Too late for me to recommend your comment (0+ / 0-)

      But that is a great idea. We should all repeat ad nauseum in every diary about unemployment.

      Californians: The Courage Campaign is working for changing the 2/3 budget rule and for ending Prop 8. Go!

      by tmo on Tue Jul 13, 2010 at 07:00:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  At what point will people (6+ / 0-)

    begin to realize that the Republican Party has no interest in them?  Will it ever happen?

    I try to understand why people vote for Republicans, and if they're not rich, there's no logical answer.

    I am, at heart, an optimist, which I consider to be spiritually necessary and proper, as well as intellectually suspect.

    by I love OCD on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:38:18 AM PDT

    •  It hasn't happened yet because there is (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      I love OCD

      NO PAYOFF to fomenting public fury many months before people have any opportunity to take action.  Blaming Republicans for destroying the economy and warning voters about what they risk by voting Republican in 2010 will begin to happen in earnest in September.

      That's simple reason, and simple politics.  Talk to voters when they are paying attention.

      Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

      by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:43:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Excellent point, but I was (0+ / 0-)

        talking more in the general scheme of things  - my fantasy world where no one who isn't a millionaire ever votes Republican again.  ;-)

        I am, at heart, an optimist, which I consider to be spiritually necessary and proper, as well as intellectually suspect.

        by I love OCD on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 10:58:53 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  That will not happen magically. (0+ / 0-)

      It takes a concerted effort by the leaders of the other party to demonstrate and illustrate this constantly through messaging.  Instead one side begs for cooperation and reinforces the other sides principles.  (dems) while the other consistently reinforcesthe ineffectiveness and distaste for the other side (rep).

      The result is a 2 year break for republicans while being able to basically continue the policies with minimal opposition.

      "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

      by justmy2 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 05:06:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Listening to a Republican financial talk show (13+ / 0-)

    I learn that helping the unemployed long term becomes enabling, because unless we cut off their benefits, those without work will become dependent and depressed, not spurred to become achievers and innovators.  That tasting hardship spurs people to adapt and evolve and learn how to become financially successful.

    And then it hits me...what a bad combination!  

    These Republicans are both mean and crazy.    

    If cats could blog, they wouldn't.

    by crystal eyes on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:38:49 AM PDT

  •  Where's that Rec Button when you need it. (7+ / 0-)

    The deficit is a canard and everyone dealing with this in DC knows it. It will take care of itself once the life blood is flowing again.

    Way too much real wealth has been concentrated in WAY TOO FEW HANDS. No wonder vampire movies are all the rage.

    Welcome to the Corporate States of America ®, give us your money, then die quietly.

    by geez53 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:40:03 AM PDT

    •  It's time to redistribute the wealth, (0+ / 0-)

      and then set up new rules so that the welfare of the American People will ALWAYS trump the right of a few selfish, callous, greedy and profoundly stupid people to make as much money as they can.

      Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

      by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:50:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  ShelterBox better start stocking up for this huge (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tmo, 3goldens, DianeNYS, wsexson, geez53

    new wave of homeless American families.  I'm sure the GOP will offer own front yards.

    " It's shocking what Republicans will do to avoid being the 2012 presidential nominee."

    by jwinIL14 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:42:02 AM PDT

  •  Why do the Dems even attempt bipartisanship... (6+ / 0-)

    ... with the Republicans?

    The inadequate is the enemy of the necessary.

    by JRandomPoster on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:44:57 AM PDT

    •  Because the Beltway village demands it... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      3goldens, shaharazade
      ...I realize many Daily Kos posters think the politicians in Washington D.C. are influenced by "the people"...they are not.

      Lobbyists notwithstanding, they are influenced most by the Beltway village.

      And the Beltway village demands bipartisanship.

      Most Democrats (specifically, Barack Obama) feels  the Beltway village is very clever when it comes to articulating political strategy.

      Why, I have no idea. I suppose it's a matter of sheltered aristocrats being held captive to their own echo chamber.

      Mr. president, I request unanimous consent that the panther not be teased.

      by wyvern on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:54:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Bipartisanship. Why? Here's why. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      annieli

      Always get the opposition to buy into, to commit to something.

      Co-opt the opposition.

      Build coalitions.

      Diversify.

      Otherwise.....tends to get discarded too fast, as if it were only a one-sided power grab.

      Sugarcoat the pill.

      The label "bipartisan" removes the Lightning Rod aspect, the "Kick Me" sign.

      NOTE: When Public Opinion is extremely in favor of something, then bipartisanship is less needed.

      I'm afraid it cuts both ways. For example, scare the wits out of Americans with cries of war, terror, etc. and you can ram through whatever you want. It does take a complicit media, though, to help "manufacture consent."

      P.S.

      You might say that bipartisanship is a step up:

      Civilization

      Civilization is a process in the service of Eros, whose purpose is to combine single human individuals, and after that families, then races, peoples and nations, into one great unity, the unity of mankind. Why this has to happen, we do not know; the work of Eros is precisely this.

         Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Austrian psychiatrist. Civilization and its Discontents, ch. 6 (1931; repr. in Complete Works, Standard Edition, ed. by James Strachey and Anna Freud, vol. 21, 1961).

      The Columbia Dictionary of Quotations is licensed from Columbia University Press. Copyright © 1993, 1995, 1997, 1998 by Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

      Media Reform Action Link http://stopbigmedia.com/

      by LNK on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:58:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The democrats use it as cover... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      3goldens, shaharazade

      to water down progressive legislation and, sadly, because some are naive enough to think republicans can be dealt with in good faith.

      The Republicans are coming...

      by dclawyer06 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:27:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  hobos.. (0+ / 0-)

    Can someone living on EI even afford cable tv?

    Maybe we should make it free, so that they can.  I know... we could call it FreeVee.

    (Stephen King / The Running Man reference)

    •  Notice that the digital TV conversion happened (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      barbwires, shaharazade, La Gitane

      so that in order to get even local channels, one has to have a cable box. Then, they started raising monthly rates. Now, a lot of people have lost their paychecks and can't afford this extra money.

      They should be reducing the rates -- I like your idea of free. Internet access should also not be controlled by corporations who only want to make profits.

      It may come back to bite them in the butt. The only reason so many people haven't already taken to the streets is the daily Soma provided by TV. If the machine in the corner suddenly has no pretty pictures for them to see, they might have to find some other way to occupy their time.

      "The difference between the right word and the almost-right word is like the difference between lightning and the lightning bug." -- Mark Twain

      by Brooke In Seattle on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:30:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The heartless are counting on the clueless... (7+ / 0-)

    ... and confused - to take out their purposefully misdirected anger on the wrong people.

    It's tough to make progress when the other side is fighting you every inch of the way.

    End the filibuster and do what's necessary.

    Trillions for the bankers, none for us?

    Fuck that.

    The time for action is now.  No more games.

    I suggest the homeless, or soon to be, come to Washington by any means available and camp out on the mall.

    I think millions of people 'in their face' will be hard to ignore.

    It's time for the pitchforks and torches! Guillotines are way too complicated.

    by No one gets out alive on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:47:53 AM PDT

    •  If masses of people take to the streets...... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Boston to Salem

      it will only cause a "law and order" backlash. We have seen this time, and time again.

      There is a huge difference between REAL organizing and what we think of as having been effective street demonstrations. For example, Dr. King's March on Washington was one event in decades of extremely correct person to person organizing.

      Do you really want to see reports of angry people -- unemployed -- would look like if set into motion? Glance at this:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/...

      We are up against a highly polished, well-oiled, and powerful machine on the side of Big Business, media, etc.

      Act wisely.

      Media Reform Action Link http://stopbigmedia.com/

      by LNK on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:05:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  A million people standing silently (0+ / 0-)

        Would be powerful.

        The fuckers have shown that they will send posers in to the crowds to cause trouble, to give the police an excuse to riot.

        Canada just spend ONE BILLION dollars on security for the G20.  The cops dropped off cars and waited for them to get burned, so they could show off on TV. 200 black brigade activists couldn't be stopped by 20,000 police that were watching them the whole time.  

        Then they beat up the nosy journalists who asked hard questions.

        No sure what to do.

        Not likely that a million people can do a Ghandi.

        We will have to overwhelm them.  And take losses.

        It's time for the pitchforks and torches! Guillotines are way too complicated.

        by No one gets out alive on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:37:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  That's nonsense. Masses taking to the (2+ / 0-)

        streets creates media coverage.  Media coverage create public attention.  When people pay attention, they learn the truth that Republicans ruined their economy.  When voters know the truth, they vote Democrat.

        Taking to the streets is by far not the only necessary strategy, but it gets people's attention.

        Read Teixeira's 2010 report, and see why the GOP is done.

        by Georgeo57 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:53:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Media coverage will be hostile (0+ / 0-)

          Even if 1 million people behaved perfectly the corporate media is not sympathetic.

          Back in the civil rights protest era the media was very much on the protesters' side. Plus, there was more than 10 times the diversity in media ownership.

          Media coverage only works in favor of those groups who have good organization and solidarity.

          Media Reform Action Link http://stopbigmedia.com/

          by LNK on Tue Jul 13, 2010 at 08:42:18 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Sorta how those millions of people in 2003 (0+ / 0-)

          Oh you mean like how those millions of people marching against the imminent Iraq war in 2003 got people's attention? I went to one of those million-person-marches in SF. It got covered on page 10 of the local paper and didn't even make the local TV news. Nobody gives a crap when leftists march. We'd have gotten more coverage if we called ourselves conservatives and had a dozen people meeting on a street corner.

          Californians: The Courage Campaign is working for changing the 2/3 budget rule and for ending Prop 8. Go!

          by tmo on Tue Jul 13, 2010 at 07:04:43 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Why push dole creation instead of jobs? WWRD? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade, La Gitane

    WWRD  - What Would Roosevelt Do?

    Democrats need to run as the party of more jobs not the party of more doles.  

    Obama has to put some direct Main Street job program on the table now.  Top-down stimulus and 'hope' have run their course.

    •  Stimulus was half vast (9+ / 0-)

      and not focused well enough on investing in infrastructure that will lead to long-term job growth.

      look for my DK Greenroots diary series Thursday evening. "It's the planet, stupid."

      by FishOutofWater on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:05:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  have you adjusted your take on future (0+ / 0-)

        stimuli in view of bonddad's projections? (I see your comment on his diary; I've been reading his postings at 538.)

        Also, I had replied to your comment on Troubadour's diary. I would appreciate your follow-up there if you'd care to respond.

        Seeing your cv, i see our fields of interest and experience intersect; mine including energy (inc. nuclear fusion and solar), space, and environment.

        ambiguity is okay--if you know what I mean

        by dorkenergy on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 05:21:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  This same battle was fought ... (4+ / 0-)

      ... in the first years of FDR's Administration. The "dole" was considered the more fiscally responsible use of taxpayer money as compared to direct government employment.

      FDR didn't get it right from the beginning. Things got worse and he and his team had to be pressured by circumstances to push for more over time.

      Most of us are understandably frustrated that this lesson has to be learned again, but it's not like everyone admits that Employment is a problem worthy of Government concern. There are DEFICITS years, if not decades, into the future which require greater attention and concern :-P

      "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." -- Frederick Douglass

      by Egalitare on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:11:47 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The WPA jobs program was in first 100 days (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tmo, shaharazade, La Gitane

        So there was not too much reliance on the dole. The CCC followed soon thereafter.

        •  Actually, it's the opposite... (3+ / 0-)

          ...CCC came first, in March 1933. WPA was not established until April 1935.

          Don't tell you what you believe. Tell me what you do and I'll tell you what you believe.

          by Meteor Blades on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 10:33:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Not according to what I read via Google (0+ / 0-)

            Franklin Delano Roosevelt was inaugurated to the Presidency of the United States on March 4, 1933, bringing with him a hope for better times in the midst of the Great Depression. In May of 1933 the Federal Emergency Relief Administration was allocated $500,000,000 in direct relief of money to be spent by the federal government through state and local agencies. The National Industrial Recovery Act passed by Congress and signed by FDR on June 16, 1933, supported an enormous appropriation of money in the sum of $3,300,000,000 for relief through public works to be dispensed at FDR's discretion.

            •  There are several comprehensive histories ... (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Meteor Blades

              ...  of the New Deal, all of which will document that while FERA was authorized in 1933, no multiple year direct federal employment started until 1935. The first couple of years were the 30's version of "shovel ready"  - literally: projects such as park trails, levees, road improvements, etc. that could start up and finish before the end of the calendar year, with no guarantee of re-employment the next year. There was a fear that "natural employment" by the Private Sector would be unduly disrupted by a long term direct government employment program. This even after nearly 4 years of "Prosperity is just around the corner." GOP obstruction is certainly not original in this regard.

              The one I read most recently is The Coming of the New Deal, 1933-1935, by Arthur Schlesinger.

              "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." -- Frederick Douglass

              by Egalitare on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 03:58:12 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

  •  The really sad thing? The GOP... (3+ / 0-)

    come election time, will frame this as "Congress" let the unemployment payments lapse "and you know who controls Congress."

    Be sure to tell everyone you know who is affected that it was the GOP that blocked this, not the Democrats who failed to pass it.

    Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

    by Sirenus on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:48:43 AM PDT

  •  Gimme ONE image please. (10+ / 0-)

    Map of USA with 'black holes' where jobs used to be before American corporations sent our jobs overseas in order to increase their profit margins.

    I'm so sorry I don't have time now to explain more about what businessmen and what Republicans think about why this unemployment tragedy is a GOOD thing, but it can be traced back to their religious and philosophical sentiments.

    It has something to do with farming. .. . .like culling the heard, weeding, getting rid of 'bad apples'.........Their ideas about "good breeding" and keeping the rabble in line.

    Quick start here:
    Chicago School. Leo Strauss.

    "Leo Strauss' Philosophy of Deception
    Many neoconservatives . . . . are disciples of a philosopher who believed that the elite should use deception, religious fervor and perpetual war to control the ignorant masses."

    http://www.alternet.org/...

    Media Reform Action Link http://stopbigmedia.com/

    by LNK on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:49:23 AM PDT

  •  Us & Them (2+ / 0-)

    Us and Them
    And after all we're only ordinary men
    Me, and you
    God only knows it's not what we would choose to do
    Forward he cried from the rear
    And the front rank died
    The General sat, and the lines on the map
    Moved from side to side

    Black and Blue
    And who knows which is which and who is who
    Up and Down
    And in the end it's only round and round and round
    Haven't you heard it's a battle of words
    The poster bearer cried
    Listen son, said the man with the gun
    There's room for you inside

    Down and Out
    It can't be helped but there's a lot of it about
    With, without
    And who'll deny it's what the fighting's all about
    Out of the way, it's a busy day
    I've got things on my mind
    For want of the price of tea and a slice
    The old man died

    Conservatives have a special gift for cloaking self-interest in self-righteousness.

    by Sarge in Seattle on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:50:20 AM PDT

  •  I believe there are three kinds of poor (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    La Gitane, vzfk3s

    There is the circumstantially poor.  This is the person who has been productive but through unemployment, medical problems or other circumstances out of his control is down on his luck and needs help.  Poor children are always in this category, because their poverty is never the result of anything they have done.  Programs to catch this person in free fall and get him on his feet are apt to result in his returning to being productive and prosperous.

    There is the chronically poor.  This is the person who has given up hope, given up trying, just trying to survive.  While some are chronically poor having been born into it, others have mental illnesses, in many cases this is the next step from being circumstantially poor.  Programs to get this person on his feet are not likely to change his circumstances.  It is important to keep this person fed but he will not respond well to education programs, etc.  It is important to catch the circumstantially poor before they join the ranks of chronically poor.

    There is the professional poor.  These are people who have learned how to work the system, work churches, charitable organizations and ordinary people.  This is the poor person republicans always point to when coming up with reasons not to help the poor.  While these people do exist, their numbers are greatly exaggerated and most anecdotes cited about them are mythical.  The key is to protect our programs against them.  This type of poor can be a step after circumstantially poor, where the person becomes cynical and also figures out how to get by.  Again, catching the circumstantially poor will reduce the (probably already low) numbers here.

    We can't treat all poor the same.  We need to look at our programs to ensure they are having results.  But these unemployment benefits are one way to catch the circumstantially poor (where our investment is most likely to succeed) before they wind up in another of the categories, where our efforts are not apt to have good results.

    I'm only hard headed when you take me for granite

    by Im a frayed knot on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:55:48 AM PDT

  •  I think you mean bums, not hobos (0+ / 0-)

    A bum does work. A hobo is, essentially, a migratory worker.

  •  Here's your answer MB (7+ / 0-)

    How large does the Democratic majority have to become before we see somebody with political clout actually doing something instead of merely talking about our chronic economic problems?

    In the Senate, I figure about 110 Democratic senators ought to about get it.

    Is that a real poncho, or is that a Sears' poncho? - Frank Zappa

    by JoesGarage on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:59:07 AM PDT

  •  Hundreds line up for help with cooling bills (7+ / 0-)

    Hundreds of people seeking help with electricity bills driven higher by the early summer heat stood in line for hours Monday morning at the Urban Government Center on Barret Avenue.

    The Louisville Metro Community Action Partnership received $311,000 in federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program money that will be handed out to eligible Jefferson County residents until it is gone. The money is distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis.

    The line was 400 people deep at 8 a.m. -- stretching down a hallway inside the center, out the door and snaking down the sidewalk, around the front of the building and back around the other side. By 8:45 a.m., the line had grown.

    Lois Cleveland, who lives in western Louisville, was at the end of the line. Her monthly electric bill, normally about $100, has ballooned to $243. Cleveland has grandchildren, ages 1 and 4, in her home, so she has to keep it cool.

    http://www.courier-journal.com/...

    Here we are now Entertain us I feel stupid and contagious

    by Scarce on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 07:59:28 AM PDT

  •  Food stamp challenge. (5+ / 0-)

    A few years ago, some representatives decided to accept a food stamp challenge and they learned the hard way that being poor isn't easy.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    They need to try not only food stamps again but a month on unemployment benefits might open their eyes a little too.

    There was another challenge in '09.

    http://democrats.assembly.ca.gov/...

    "The human eye is a wonderful device. With a little effort, it can fail to see even the most glaring injustice." Richard K. Morgan

    by sceptical observer on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:01:06 AM PDT

  •  Fabulous commentary (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade

    Thank you.

  •  My AC is broken. A reminder of how it is (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    3goldens, shaharazade

    for millions of people who have hit the wall.

    The elitists in Congress who won't help the unemployed would do well to go without AC for a week as a reminder of how it is for the working poor and the long-term unemployed.

    Thanks for focusing on the critical issues, brilliantly.

    look for my DK Greenroots diary series Thursday evening. "It's the planet, stupid."

    by FishOutofWater on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:03:04 AM PDT

  •  Without spending from the working class, (7+ / 0-)

    the economy collapses. This is what we are starting to see now.

    UI benefits inject money into the economy; these funds circulate, and help to maintain jobs. When UI benefits are cut, it forces even more people to lose their jobs.

    The quickest way to inject money into the economy is from the bottom up, not the top down. The quickest way to kill an economy is to cut off the funds from the bottom.

    Republicans, if they were in power would be issuing UI benefits to boost the economy prior to the election: since they are in the minority, they'll do everything they can to make Democrats look bad [and some of the Blue Dog jerks will join them, because they want to make the rest of the Democratic Party look bad, too].

    James Carville emerges from the conflagration, riding a burning alligator.

    by shpilk on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:03:19 AM PDT

  •  ineligibles (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    3goldens, shaharazade, La Gitane

    that's me. I quit a decent job in Coral Springs, FL in May of 2008. I then moved to Concord, NC. I haven't found a job. I quit looking over a year ago. I've found welding jobs fairly easy for 20 years. now when I go to interview they ask if I can pass a symbol test. LOL
    I find stuff to do to keep my truck up & eat. no biggie, I'm single never married or had kids.

    things will get better & I'll be ok.

    you cant fool all of the people all of the time unless they watch fox news

    by eeff on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:05:27 AM PDT

    •  Me too (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      eeff

      Self employed, (was) successful...  even if there were jobs, it would be hard for me to find one because I haven't been employed in over six years.  People are skittish about hiring the self-employed.

      Just doing odd jobs for cash in order to get by, on food stamps (a whopping $119/month) and I do have a rent subsidy from the ARRA until the end of the year.  I was very lucky to get that; between the two it's basically the equivalent of unemployment.  But, I'm starting to freak out about what to do when the subsidy runs out...  hoping to have at least a couple months of rent saved up by then...

      "Mediocrity cannot know excellence." -- Sherlock Holmes

      by La Gitane on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:01:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I have pointed this out a couple of times (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jagger, wsexson, Brian B, shaharazade

    But it bears repeating.

    The original source of funding for continuing the extended unemployment benefits was unused/returned TARP funds. This is money that would not require any addition to the deficit or the national debt as it has already been created by Treasury borrowing. It is a reasonable way to do it along with those other ways you mention.

    But that was not acceptable to the Republicans. Nor was it acceptable to the 12 Democrats that voted with the Republicans.

    So, what is the proposed way of funding the extension of Extended Unemployment Benefits?

    All weekly unemployment checks would be cut by $25. This $25 comes from ARRA aka the "Stimulus Bill".

    All food stamp weekly allocations would be cut by $11.
    This $11 also came from ARRA.

    Both of those provisions of ARRA were meant to last beyond 2010. But the Democrats reworking the Extended Unemployment bill are ending them early. So not only are they actively pulling stimulus money from the economy but what's worse is they are actually paying for the extension by taking from the poor and the unemployed to cover the poor and unemployed.

    And that almost passed, save for Ben Nelson. Ben didn't block it because of the way it was financed by taking from the disadvantaged and giving less overall to the disadvantaged. I guess the bill wasn't bad enough yet.

    What I can't believe is that Democrats actually proposed this and were going along with it. It missed clearing cloture by a vote. That kind of legislation is a Republican wet dream.

    The net effect of this thing passing with this funding in its current form is to make things worse for those in poverty and the unemployed. That $25 a week may be just enough for some to make it by but without it they could end up defaulting on loans or be unable to afford utilities, etc. The same is true for the $11 for food.

    This is ugly legislation in the name "deficit reduction" in that it is cutting "entitlement" programs. Reprehensible garbage is what it is.

  •  A pox on all of their houses. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jagger, greenearth, shaharazade

    "Try not to become a man of success, but rather to become a man of value." ~ Albert Einstein

    by LamontCranston on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:08:39 AM PDT

  •  Since the Democratic Party is a Conservativ Party (6+ / 0-)

    that only has progressives in it, the size of the party majority is not relevant.

    Conservatives have about a 2/3 majority in government. That's the problem.

    The first problem is how to get enough progressives into power that we can drag government to a break even middle, sufficiently nonconservative to govern to stop the decline of the people.

    Stopping the decline of the people is a radical notion at this point in our history, and requires policies that are radical to the thinking of Democratic Party leadership.

    Again it _doesn't matter how larger the party majority gets.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:11:09 AM PDT

  •  1930s versus now (2+ / 0-)

    Back in the 1930s the American population was better prepared for hardship -- basic skills in how to make do, much better social skills needed to keep people sane, stronger extended families and communities.

    Plus, I hate to say it but the suffering people looked more like the people in power so they were harder to be dismissed. Basic human psychology.

    There had been a tremendous 'levelling' of society during World War One when rich, middle class, and poor were thrown together in the war effort.

    And there was a totally vivid image - - UGLY - - to galvanize America if we failed to solve the crisis of the Great Depression:  Europe! Extremism! Communist Revolution or Fascist Tyranny.

    Media Reform Action Link http://stopbigmedia.com/

    by LNK on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:15:03 AM PDT

  •  Thank you for mentioning those (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jagger

    who aren't eligible for benefits but who are just as unemployed.

    In addition to those who were never eligible, there are those like me, who drew a flat six months of benefits that ended before all these extensions were granted.

    There should be retroactive unemployment as well as benefits for those who in previous iterations were ineligible because they are sole proprietors or freelancers or some other job category that doesn't allow for unemployment insurance.

    But that WOULD make the skinflints scream, wouldn't it.

    "Not fair! Not fair that I have to go to work every day and you sit home and collect money for not working!"

    We need a guaranteed minimum income in this country and a whole lot more jobs in order to keep as many people as possible from needing to draw that extra money.

    It's impossible to make it in this country without money, but the rich and powerful -- and the greedy and hateful -- have made sure that we have no jobs AND no money.

    And if there ever were an "uprising," I'm afraid the stupid people would direct their ire against the wrong group, blaming the blameless for their dire straits, instead of assigning credit where credit is due -- and voting out every Republican up for election so we can have some progress in this country instead of continuing to stagnate.

    Jobs, jobs, jobs -- and an extension of benefits -- should be the only thing on the agenda from now until adjournment.

    "The difference between the right word and the almost-right word is like the difference between lightning and the lightning bug." -- Mark Twain

    by Brooke In Seattle on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:16:19 AM PDT

  •  The Senate pay cut is a bogus comparison (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Brooke In Seattle

    Most of these guys don't really rely on their salaries.  Yes, there is the occasional Joe Biden, but most of these guys have independent wealth.

    It matters to them as much whether they get their paycheck as whether their Pick Three ticket paid off this week - not at all.

    Progressive -> Progress; Conservative -> Con

    by nightsweat on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:16:26 AM PDT

  •  Money is to blame! (7+ / 0-)

    Instead of tinkering with single issues... instead of only putting out brush fires...... we need to get more strategic. I repeat a previous comment I made on another thread:


    MOLLY IVINS

    Paul Krugman, the Nobel-winning economist who writes a column for The New York Times, where Molly was a miserable misfit, struck the right note exactly at the time of her death. "Obituaries that mostly stressed her satirical gifts missed the main point," Krugman wrote. "Her satire was only the means to an end: holding the powerful accountable."
    "Either we figure out how to keep corporate cash out of the political system or we lose the democracy."
    —Ivins in 2006

    The cornerstone of a lifelong commitment to holding power accountable was her crusade against dollar democracy, a mission that became a magnificent obsession.  From her experience covering the Texas legislature, no one knew better than Ivins that money—dirty money, funny money, way too much money—clings like the most stubborn form of filth to every exposed surface of this failing political system. In words that could not be mistaken for anyone else's, she warned us, "Oligarchy is eating our ass, our dreams, our country, our heritage, our democracy, our justice and our tax code." Six months before she died, Ivins summed it up, "Either we figure out how to keep corporate cash out of the political system or we lose the democracy."
    http://www.indyweek.com/...

    GET MONEY OUT OF POLITICS!

    ACTION LINK FOR FAIR ELECTIONS:

    http://www.commoncause.org/

    Emphasis is mine.

    Media Reform Action Link http://stopbigmedia.com/

    by LNK on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:19:17 AM PDT

  •  We need another kind of (0+ / 0-)

    We need another party in our country.Not the dumb tea party.We need one that includes everyone.

  •  I stopped being mad at republicans (11+ / 0-)

    For being Republicans a long time ago.  They have proven the incompetence and petulance.  It is only now that Democrats are proving theirs.  

    Democrats have let a mandate go to waste and have let a minority voted out of office intentionally by the American people ride roughshod over them for 18 months.

    The real question is was it intentional.

    "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

    by justmy2 on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:26:46 AM PDT

  •  helping the ineligibles (7+ / 0-)

    They are the ones who should be helped FIRST.

    Back during the '08 election I did some taxiing of poor folks to the polls--single mothers living in projects with extended families, ex-cons, you name it. More than once I heard the complaint that the Democrats are always talking about helping the middle class but never the lower class. That is so true. Politics are all about pandering to the middle class nowadays. It's interesting how they reject the fiction promoted by politicians that everyone is middle class.

    Yeah, they all voted for Obama (except one who voted for Cynthia McKinney), but they weren't all starry-eyed about it. Being starry-eyed is hard in the projects.

    Often we hear of unemployment insurance extensions in the context of people who are out of work "through no fault of their own." I believe this is a euphemistic allusion to the chronically poor, often minorities, who by implication are at fault for their situation.

  •  Technically it's the (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Meteor Blades, wsexson

    National Employment Law Project, not the National Unemployment Law Project.

    As Heather Boushey, Christine Riodan and Luke Reidenbach at the Center for American Progress and the National Unemployment Law Project wrote last month

  •  Morning MB and thank you. (4+ / 0-)

    Thirty-eight Americans a minute. Wow.

    Tweeted this diary on twitter and it has already been retweeted 5 times.

    ;-)

    "The devil made me buy this dress!" Geraldine Jones/ Flip Wilson https://twitter.com/BlueJessamine

    by BlueJessamine on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 08:44:07 AM PDT

  •  ass-kicking mode (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade

    Kind of getting there yourself MB.

    But then, of course, quite a chunk of Democrats aren't too keen on confronting those crucial long-term issues either.

    Sounds like leadership issues to me.

  •  There are lots and lots of $7 (0+ / 0-)

    an hour jobs. I know it sucks to work those jobs, and sucks even worse to work those jobs for a measley $200 a week. But, even those sucky jobs with even suckier pay beats no pay. Grab one!

    •  I think unemp bennies are best, but,............. (0+ / 0-)

      if people had to take these jobs they might wake up and realize what a nightmare the rethugs have in store for them.

      It's sad, but, I really do think the public is so stupid that this is all they understand.

      •  What is going on with you people?? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        The Truth, wsexson

        The. jobs. are. not. there.

        Unemployment "bennies" are not fun.  It is not fun to sit around every day sending out resumes, only to get no response.  It is not fun to spend $150 on gas driving around filling out job applications for jobs that you have no experience for, knowing all the while that there are dozens of others who have applied who do.

        What the fuck.

        "Mediocrity cannot know excellence." -- Sherlock Holmes

        by La Gitane on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:50:09 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I know. I agree. But, why doesn't the public... (0+ / 0-)

          see this?  Why doesn't public understand that when most people work for small businesses that these businesses are nothing but shit to wallstreet?  Why doesn't the public see that BP is a wallstreet company not a mainstreet company?  Why doesn't the public see that deregulating wallstreet companies is anti-business because those wallstreet companies will destroy the mainstreet companies, i.e., the public's lively hood.  Why doesn't the public see the shrinking pond they are in while wallstreet's pond is always getting bigger?  Why doesn't the public see that wallstreet is syphoning the water out of the mainstreet pond?  Why doesn't the public see that unemployment bennfits is more water for the mainstreet pond?  Why is the public so stupid?

        •  They don't call it unenjoyment for nuthin'. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          La Gitane

          Fact is, "good paying jobs" ain't never coming back. Ever! That's the bad news. The good news?? That HUUUGE vacuum?? It needs filling. We could put a HUUUGE dent in Wall Street by creating our own "Economy." A "Blue" economy. A "Buy Blue" economy. Kinda like the old black market or nuveau gray market. I'm old. I live below the "poverty line." So, I really don't give a rats ass if "The Economy" ever recovers. It can all go to hell in a handbasket for all I care. Truly! I really don't give a flip! Wall Street has stacked the deck and don't care if "The Economy" here ever recovers. Hell, they would rather it didn't! Fuck the ungrateful American workers! Suckers! Their money - and business - is "Global" these days. They couldn't care less about the Red, White and Blue, except how bribing a congress critter or two can help them, all the while sticking it up a dKos Member's rectum. A twofer! The only way I see out of this mess is to simply ignore the "real" economy and start our own. Seriously. Start a "Craigs List" of Blue businesses and do business with those businesses. Avoid a "Fortune 1000" Company at all costs. Deal strictly with Blue businesses. Eventually those Blue businesses grow and... need workers.
          In the meantime, NY 23 has zero unenjoyment up here. None. The only people not working up here are those that can't, are retired, or don't want to. Period. So... grab a hammer and come on up! That's NOT to say that many of us aren't "underemployed."
          We are! But, we're all working.

    •  The minimum wage in Australia is $22 an hour (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      The Truth, wsexson, La Gitane

      Here it is below self-sufficiency, even in the most miserable terms.

      If you make 200 a week and your rent is above 800 dollars you will be homeless as soon as whatever savings you have left are gone. You'll be homeless sooner or later if your rent is half that rate.

      Do the fucking math you asshole and tell me how I keep a roof over my head at those wages.

      But really, don't waste my fucking time with your privileged advice, I am far more expert at surviving below the poverty line than you are and I resent your arrogant and ignorant dismissal of my concerns.

      Your advice flies in the face of the reality that over 60 million people are in serious economic danger. Not just the 9.7% who are receiving unemployment benefits, not only the greater 15-20% who are collecting benefits, have dropped out of the job hunt or are underemployed, but the tens of millions of people who were already in poverty before this latest round of economic crisis exploded.

      Your comments also reflect ignorance of the fact that 20-30 million people or more are chasing 3-5 million jobs, including all the shitty ones that pay minimum wage.

      And there's lots more shitty ones and fewer living wage jobs.

      Indeed, there are many millions more people in economic danger and crisis than our absurd measure of of poverty - three times a thrifty basket of food - would suggest (15-20%).

      If our measure of poverty were based on three times your community's median housing costs - well in line with 'commonsense' personal budget management - the percentage of poor people in this country would rise far past 33%.

      Your callous attitude and ignorance are only making matters worse.  

      •  Thank you (0+ / 0-)

        What an ass.

        I have whittled my monthly expenses (I am self employed, so this includes business expenses) down to $1200/mo.  I am able to do that because I have a rent subsidy and food stamps.  Get rid of that assistance and I need $2k to make it.

        I do not have an expensive car, I do not have an expensive apartment.  My rent is $750/mo.  Among the many things I have given up are my health insurance, hair cuts and almost all of my business expenses, including my office.  I don't have much left to cut; tv and sell my car.  And for what?  An extra $200/mo?  And then I have no car and my credit sucks so bad that I don't have a clue when I could buy a new one.  And try job hunting or client rustling without a car.

        So, yes, $7/hr is ridiculous.  I would have to work 80 hours a week to make it.  And like I said above, that doesn't leave a heckuva lot of time to look for a better job, or build my business back up.

        God that commenter pissed me off.  Thank you.

        "Mediocrity cannot know excellence." -- Sherlock Holmes

        by La Gitane on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:20:43 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  What the hell is your problem?? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      The Truth, wsexson

      There are lots and lots of $7/hr jobs??  Really??  And who told you that - the fucking job fairy?

      The Bureau of Labor Statistics just announced that we are at six job seekers to every job.  That means your best chance to land one of your **fabulous** $7/hr jobs is 1 in 6.  And that is before you factor in the inevitable "friend of a friend", the fact that you are a 45 year old professional who hasn't worked in retail in 20 years, and the fact that working a crap job like that is so time consuming that you don't have time to look for a job in your field.  Try skipping your afternoon shift at Starbuck's because you got a coveted interview at an architecture firm - guess what - your Starbuck's job is going to be gone.

      What an ass.  I don't know how old you are, or what kind of job you have, but you certainly don't know jack shit about the reality of the true devastation that is out there.

      I hope that you don't have to experience it first hand.

      "Mediocrity cannot know excellence." -- Sherlock Holmes

      by La Gitane on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:44:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well said! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        La Gitane

        I live in a hard-hit town - Wilmington, Ohio - unemployment is close to 20%.  It is sad and depressing.  I talk to people every day who, even if they take that wonderful job for $7/hr, will have to file bankruptcy, or possibly lose their home.  I expect that sort of reasoning from Republicans - not from my fellow democrats.

        •  I was in tears the other night (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          The Truth

          while at a friend's house - a liberal friend, mind you - and she started in on this "well, extending benefits takes away the motivation to work, don't you think?"

          Well I busted into tears and frankly ripped her a new one.  I am self employed, so I don't get unemployment.  But I do get a rent subsidy from the ARRA that will expire at the end of the year. And I'm scared shitless.  Without it, I would be homeless.  Very literally.

          I asked her if she really thought that I wasn't working because I was getting a rent subsidy.  Yeah, do you really think that??

          She profusely apologized, and I hope that from here on out she will have a better understanding of what so many people are going through.

          "Mediocrity cannot know excellence." -- Sherlock Holmes

          by La Gitane on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 12:06:58 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Let the Devil ... And, what has my oyster........ (0+ / 0-)

    done for me lately?

  •  Thank you (0+ / 0-)

    Meteor Blades for keeping this issue in the public light. Your writings on this subject should be required reading for everyone on Daily Kos or anyone doesn't want to see political and economic disaster in our future.

    Failure to do anything but warehouse the unemployed, while abandoning everyone below the investor class to the predatory paradise Obama's neo-Republican policies have produced,is a stone-cold recipe for political disaster.

    [No, President Obama, it is not bad luck your economic policies produced a jobless recovery, its the direct result of saving Wall St. and the banking industry - not to mention the war industry - and leaving the rest of us to drown.]

    Threatening to cut off that flimsiest of lifelines - unemployment insurance - without having done a single honest thing jobs or living wages, besides handing out corporate welfare and tax cuts, will simply be the last fucking straw to ensure this party's political destruction.

    Just how stupid are our so-called leaders?

    Pretty fucking stupid - and graft-ridden too - if you watch them from the cheap seats.

  •  "D.C. bobbled the ballon jobless aid. Why? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greenearth

    This was a link listed on my MSN page under "Politics."  Led to AP article by Andrew Taylor.  Taylor pretty much blamed the whole unemployment problem on "some liberals", painted the Republicans as the political heroes,and ended the article with saying that "They intend to pay for it in part by cutting food stamp benefits." We are some evil jerks (snark). We need to get control of the messaging. I know that the article was slanted, biased bullshit; but a lot of people are probably going to read that crap, and think, "Those damned Democrats are keeping people from getting unemployment benefits." We need a media outlet that isn't necessarily biased in our favor; but, is unbiased and simply gets the truth out to the public.  We are getting massive amounts of propoganda put out there as factual news. Link to article - http://www.msnbc.msn.com/...

  •  i just came from the google news homepage (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greenearth

    and there was not a single story on unemployment benefits.  but on the upside, angry mouse's story on the 2nd amendment was spotlighted.

    A point in every direction is the same as no point at all.

    by oblios arrow on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:19:43 AM PDT

  •  Make the business argument (0+ / 0-)

    Aim it at the business community.

    That's 2.25 million Americans who have lost the ability to keep a roof over their heads, buy food, keep the electricity on, pay health premiums.

    No, that's 2.25 million customers who have lost the ability to buy your companies products or services.

    This is how you create jobs, by creating demand for your products and services, which requires people with a source of income (albeit a reduced temporary one in the form of an unemployment check) until there is enough demand to warrant business to hire people to meet the the increased demand.

    We need demand-side economics now!

    cheers,

    Mitch Gore

    Who is a Tea Partier? Someone who listens to Glenn Beck. Who's an anti-Tea Partier? Someone who understands Glenn Beck

    by Lestatdelc on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:25:24 AM PDT

  •  Put a face on it: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greenearth, La Gitane

    I have two brothers that at some moment in time lost their benefits.

    Filibuster Reform Now, Democrats!

    www.yesweSTILLcan.org

    by divineorder on Mon Jul 12, 2010 at 11:48:23 AM PDT

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